Recent Court Documents from the ICC Kenya Cases 20 November 2012

The Ruto/Sang Defence Teams have filed a joint request to the court to order the prosecution to indicate if it intends to continue relying on certain witnesses at trial. These witnesses’ statements were given in evidence during confirmation proceedings, but under pseudonyms and with redactions.

 

The Trial Chamber has granted Kituo cha Sheria amicus curiae status in both the Ruto/Sang and Kenyatta/Muthaura cases. The organisation will now submit observations based on the court’s Victims Decision which set out the procedure for victims’ participation at trial. Already the Office of Public Counsel for the Victims and the Registry had filed their proposals on this matter. In the course of the Kenya cases, various individuals and groups have attempted to enter proceedings as amici curiae . Most attempts failed. But in this decision, the Chamber felt that Kituo could give real assistance to the OPCV, Victims Participation and Reparations Section, Registry and Common Legal Representative as to the implementation of the Victims Decision. In particular, the Chamber noted Kituo’s various programmes on community participation at the Truth, Justice and Reconciliation Commission as well as its outreach to PEV Victims gave it specialised knowledge and experience on the implementation of a system of victims representation and participation.

 

The Prosecution has applied to delay disclosure to the Kenyatta/Muthaura defence teams of the identities of six provisional witnesses until 30 days prior to the trial. According to the application, four of the witnesses are Mungiki insiders who can testify to a link between the accused, Mungiki, and the crimes alleged. The prosecutor claims that there are security concerns, making a dry comment on “the limited pool of senior Mungiki members who are still alive and willing to testify” (Former Special Rapporteur Phillip Alston’s report on Extra-judicial killings and the videotaped testimony of Police Constable Bernard Kiriinya vividly describe why the ‘pool’ is so limited)

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Following the Hague trials of 4 Kenyans to the end. A blog by Archie Nyarango

UK Constitutional Law Association

affiliated to the International Association of Constitutional Law

AfricLaw

Advancing the rule and role of law in Africa

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